Last edited by Mikora
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

6 edition of The oil business in Latin America found in the catalog.

The oil business in Latin America

the early years

  • 74 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Beard Books in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Latin America
    • Subjects:
    • Petroleum industry and trade -- Latin America -- Case studies,
    • Petroleum industry and trade -- Government ownership -- Latin America -- Case studies

    • Edition Notes

      Originally published: Latin American oil companies and the politics of energy. Lincoln, Neb. : University of Nebraska Press, 1985. (Latin American studies series)

      Statementedited by John D. Wirth.
      GenreCase studies.
      ContributionsWirth, John D.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD9574.L3 L38 2001
      The Physical Object
      Paginationp. cm.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3947749M
      ISBN 101587981033
      LC Control Number2001035698
      OCLC/WorldCa46936150

      As oil prices plummeted, Latin America’s oil companies racked up long-term liabilities of more than $bn, or % of their countries’ combined GDP, according to data from the Natural. Latin America’s gains from this commodity boom fall only behind the Middle East oil exporting region. In contrast to previous booms, this time more commodities and more countries in the region experienced a windfall, lasting longer than any previous episode. However, not all countries benefited equally.

      The Latin American Boom (Spanish: Boom Latinoamericano) was a literary movement of the s and s when the work of a group of relatively young Latin American novelists became widely circulated in Europe and throughout the world. The Boom is most closely associated with Julio Cortázar of Argentina, Carlos Fuentes of Mexico, Mario Vargas Llosa of Peru, and . Latin America is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Romance languages such as Spanish, Portuguese, and French are predominantly is broader than the terms Ibero-America or Hispanic America in categorizing the New term comes from the fact that the predominant languages of the countries originated with the Latin Countries:

      The world’s largest energy companies are placing enormous bets on Latin America, a region rich with oil that many avoided in the past. In response to growing client demand, Lightspeed GMI announced the expansion of its Latin America (LatAm) business. With access to million panelists around the world, Lightspeed GMI can now deliver targeted consumer research across Latin America.


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The oil business in Latin America Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Oil Business in Latin America - The Early Years Paperback – January 1, by John D. Wirth (Editor) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ $ $ Paperback $ Format: Paperback. The Oil Business in Latin America: The Early Years By John D.

Wirth, Ed. /12 - Beard Books - Paperback - Reprint - pp. US$ This revealing book shows how a state enterprise in Latin America is clothed in legitimacy and empowered with a breadth of functions Publisher Comments.

Oil Business in Latin America The Early YearsEssays in this book present five case studies that offer insight into the Latin American approach to petroleum resources and industries, focusing on Standard Oil of New Jersey and the four nationalized oil companies in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and VenezBrand: Wirth, John D.

The Oil Business in Latin America: The Early Years. Essays in this book present five case studies that offer insight into the Latin American approach to petroleum resources and industries, focusing on Standard Oil of New Jersey and the four nationalized oil companies in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela.5/5(1).

This book provides a study of the transformation of the Latin American oil system from one in which the international oil companies dominated to one which is dominated by the main state oil companies, and an account of how some of the more important of the state companies Cited by: Book Description.

This book provides a study of the transformation of the Latin American oil system from one in which the international oil companies dominated to one which is dominated by the main state oil companies, and an account of how some of the more important of the state companies have operated.

Read : Hardcover. Cambridge Core - International Relations and International Organisations - Oil and Politics in Latin America - by George Philip Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our by: About this book.

Introduction. This book focuses on corporate social responsibility (CSR) records of Chinese oil investments in five Latin American countries: Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela. These investments have been spearheaded by China’s national oil companies and their behavior has been scantly studied.

energy resources – particularly oil. In this first of a series of Global Energy Briefs, IOGP looks at Central & South America*, one of the world’s major oil and gas producing regions; rich in energy resources – particularly oil.

As of the end ofthe region held one fifth of the world’s proved oil. Latin American oil production is dominated by Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela, countries that were responsible for about 75% of the region's total output in These countries are also giants on the international stage, ranking as the world's ninth, 10th and 12th biggest oil producers, respectively.

The community around the Zumaque oil well in Venezuela. Photo by Meredith Kohut. View Marcela Magno's "Land" Mexico has recently opened up its oil industry, which had been under exclusive state control for the past 75 years, to private investment: a move that will very likely reconfigure the Latin American oil industry in the decades to come.

He also describes the untapped Latin American market that exists within the borders of the United States Becker provides the reader with the initial tools and thought patterns necessary to do business in the new Latin America.

This book is a must read for entrepreneurs seeking opportunities there." - Multicultural ReviewCited by: 6. This book focuses on corporate social responsibility (CSR) records of Chinese oil investments in five Latin American countries: Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela.

These investments have been spearheaded by China’s national oil companies and their behavior has been scantly : Wenyuan Wu. Venezuela must import these, and in recent years they have come from the US, said Shannon O'Neil, senior fellow for Latin America Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Latin America is an important energy producer that contributes 12% of the world’s oil and 7% of the world’s natural gas, and a significant consumer too. Yet the bulk of Latin America’s current oil and gas production comes from mature, conventional fields while new resources are shale, pre-salt, deep-water and oil sands.

Mexico manufactures and exports the same amount of goods as the rest of Latin America combined. Foreign trade is a larger percentage of Mexico's economy than any other large country.

Mexico's No. 1 export is manufactured products. It also exports silver, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and cotton. YPF S.A. (Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales ; English: "Fiscal Oilfields") is a vertically integrated Argentine energy company, engaged in oil and gas exploration and production, and the transportation, refining, and marketing of gas and petroleum arters: Repsol-YPF Tower, Buenos Aires.

Latin America /// Equinor awards subsea integration alliance integrated FEED contract for Bacalhau field Valerie Bosse is the new managing director of the Wintershall Dea Business Unit Brazil.

This dismal collective performance is a blot on Latin America’s credibility. The rot started in Venezuela in the early years of this century when Hugo Chávez, its late leader, turned PDVSA, a world-class state oil company, into a piggy bank for his free-spending populism, and then scared off foreign investors.

The oil companies defied efforts of Latin American governments to apply national labor laws to the foreign petroleum companies operating in their countries. In addition, the foreign companies drained oil deposits rapidly, without concern for the long-term development of the industry.

Latin America Oil and Gas. Total production of crude oil was million barrels per day in and will increase in the coming years. Four countries (Venezuela, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina) are accountable for 84% of total regional production. New investments aim to increase refining capacity to thousand barrels per day by Bello Latin America’s new war of religion.

Blurring the separation between church and state. print-edition icon. Knotty tale The mystery of quipus—Incan. Brazil is the second largest oil producer in Latin America with the country having an annual oil production of an estimated million tons.

The proven oil reserves in Brazil are the second largest in both Latin America and the Caribbean, which at billion barrels is only surpassed by Venezuela.